Tag Archives: learning design

Concept: Slope of the land under classified vegetation determines the severity of a bushfire

Concept for an interactive device that demonstrates how slope of the land under classified vegetation determines the severity of a bushfire.

The learner can increase or decrease the angle of the upslope and downslope. As a result the severity of the approaching bushfire will change. The bushfire’s severity is based on a premise of the fire’s intensity doubling for each 10° rise in slope.

Concept: The distance of vegetation from a building determines the level of bushfire risk to the building

Concept for an interactive device that demonstrates how the distance of vegetation from a building determines the level of bushfire risk to the building. The learner can select a vegetation type, increase or decrease the distance of vegetation from the building and increase or decrease the angle of the slope. The Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) rating, description and level of bushfire risk for permutations of the vegetation, distance and slope variables are displayed based on learner interaction. The BAL rating, description and level of bushfire risk to building is based on data from the Australian Standard AS 3959–Construction of buildings in bushfire-prone areas.

Updated working drawing for the Distance of vegetation demonstration with amended distance and slope controls. Show risk consent button has been removed.
Updated working drawing for the Distance of vegetation demonstration with sequencing instructions.
Original working drawing for the Distance of vegetation demonstration

Listen to Black Sabbath: A reflection on the nature of instruction

I was crossing the street during my lunch break the other day when a piece of graffiti written on a pole nearby caught my attention. The graffiti read Listen to Black Sabbath. This immediately made me think about two things.

  1. That I had to listen to one of the greatest rock ‘n’ roll bands of all time as quickly as possible.
  2. Figure out how was I going to do it.

The author’s direction for me to listen to Black Sabbath made me think about the importance of clear instruction when we ask a learner to complete a task. Sure, the author had described what they wanted me to do (listen to Black Sabbath), but they didn’t tell me how I supposed do it. I guess the author assumed that anyone who read their instruction would’ve had an understanding of how they were to carry out the instruction. This might be ok if the author was around to provide additional information about how to complete the task, but in this case they were nowhere to be seen.

When we ask a learner to complete a task we need to remember to give them enough instructional support to allow them to complete or at the very least attempt the task. It’s the what (you want the learner to do) and the how (they can do it) that needs to be made clear to the learner.

Concept: The activity flow

During the initial design stage of an activity I like to use pen and paper to quickly map out the flow of the activity. The tactile nature of paper allows for scribbles and scrawls, coloured pens or pencils, hasty redraws, cutting, tearing, taping and a rendezvous with the scanner or photocopier. I think something like an iPad or Samsung Tab style device could also give me similar functionality to pen and paper. I’d like one of those. These drawings describe the flow of an activity for an e-learning resource.

 

Where to from Canada?

Judging by his recent StoryBox Demo at Brock university post Alan Levine (@cogdog) and his Storybox have managed to escape from Philly and make their way safely to Canada. That’s great news for sure, but where to from there?Just where will his mission to find the Centre of the Internet take him to next? I mean, I’ve heard rumours that Alan is planning to visit Australia, but I fear for his safety in transit. The same people or mysterious organisation that abducted him in the first place may still be trying to prevent him from finding the Centre of the Internet.

I quickly recorded this response just to let Alan know to be alert as he continues his mission to find the Centre of the Internet.

Alan, if you’re reading this, please let me know that you’ve planned a safe and secure transportation for your journey to Australia. You may need to use alternate forms of communication, super-duper encryption or an alternate identity to avoid detection and guarantee your safe passage.

Good luck with the next part of your mission!

Rowan Peter

How do you get out of Philly?

So…I’ve been out of town for a few days. I arrived home to find out that Alan Levine (@cogdog) had not only managed to use a mysterious secret hatch to escape from the train where he was being held hostage, but has also somehow ended up at the EDUCAUSE conference in Phil(ly)adelphia. Curious.

Now, I’m always happy to try and help out a friend in a jam. Previously, I recorded a dispatch from over here in response to Alan’s dispatch from somewhere. This time, I thought I could help Alan get out of Philly. So I quickly recorded this video in response to Alan’s ‘How did I end up in  Philadelphia’ video report.

Alan, if you’re reading this I hope that my suggestions are helpful and that you’re able to make it out of Philly.

Keep us updated with your Journey to the Centre of the Internet.

Rowan Peter