Tag Archives: metro

WIFI PASSENGER FLOW ANALYSIS TRIAL – Richmond Station

I’m interested in the teaching and learning as well as art applications of this technology. What’s interesting about this as an exercise is the wasted opportunity to celebrate and showcase respondents of their input into the data gathering and research process. Metro and Monash could have actively showcase the exercise by representing the number of passengers/users on the platform in a creative way, personally and publically – on their device and on large screens and through speakers. Doing this may mitigate some of the possible resistance by passengers who only find out about their contribution to research after the fact – they see a small sign that gives them an option of opting-out by turning-off their WIFI (and therefore disabling their own WIFI connectivity – work/study), which isn’t really fair.


WIFI PASSENGER FLOW ANALYSIS TRIAL – FAQS

Who is conducting this trial?

This trial is a joint initiative between Metro, Public Transport Victoria (PTV) and Monash University.

What is this trial about?

Metro, PTV and Monash University are conducting research to gain real time data of passenger numbers on platforms at Richmond station and on board trains travelling from Richmond across the network.

This is about using technology to provide better information to improve the services we provide to customers.

What will the trial do?

Information will be collected on how people are using Richmond Station by counting the number of Wi-Fi enabled devices on the platforms and trains.

As a result of this collection of data, Metro will be able to further analyse how it can improve the customer experience by:

collecting data to better inform future network service planning
improving information available at stations and allocation of customer service staff
Identifying crowd movements on and around platforms
providing customers with a better overall service

When will the trial take place?

The trial will commence on the 17th of February 2017 and run until the 30th of June 2017.

Where will the trial be conducted?

The trial will focus only on passenger flow on platforms 7,8,9 and 10 plus the concourse at Richmond Station and on board four trains.

All areas where this technology is active will be clearly marked to advise customers.

How does it work?

Wi-Fi routers will be installed on platforms 7,8,9 and 10, plus the concourse at Richmond Station and on four trains. These devices will be able to count the number of active Wi-Fi devices in the vicinity of these platforms.

How can I opt out?

All you need to do is to turn off the Wi-Fi on your personal device and you will not be included in this trial.

Can you access my personal information from my electronic devices?

No. Personal information is never traced or tracked.

Your devices unique identification number (MAC address) is put through two levels of encoding. This ensures your personal information cannot be traced or tracked.

How will I know what trains I’m being tracked on?

All trains where this technology is active will be clearly marked with posters to advise customers.

Will I start being registered as soon as I step on one of the 4 trains or only when we approach Richmond Station?

The technology counts the number of active WiFi devices on board the trains regardless of their location on the network. However during analysis only trains that travel through Richmond station will be considered.

Who has access to this information?

The number of devices will be the only information collected. Your personal information is never traced or tracked and will remain completely anonymous.

The raw data is only held by Monash University and will be deleted 90 days after finalisation of the trial. The statistical information will be used to gauge the accuracy of this technology and will be shared with Metro and the PTV.

How can I get more information?

For more information you can contact the PTV call centre: 1800 800 007


Passenger advisory in context.

 

Detail of the exceptionally small notice advising passengers that they’re part of a trial.

The Rock wrap

On Melbourne’s metropolitan train network, interior and exterior advertising is becoming more prevalent.  Needless to say that I was completely surprised when I entered the train and was assaulted the advertising for the new film by formerly-known-as-The Rock Dwayne Johnson.

Advertising inside a train seems to makes sense. Once inside the train, travellers become a captive audience as there’s no real means of escape from the confined space besides their devices, newspapers and their eventual exit at their desired train station.

The problem with The Rock wrap

The problem with The Rock wrap is that didn’t allow for an action (other than an increased awareness) to take place. Ideally, there should have been a provision for train travellers to book or pre-book tickets to the film or at least find out where the movie is a showing (possibly within their current location or nearest train station/exit point). Doing this would have closed the loop on the consumer experience.

The interior advertising included a wrap on the end of the train and doors on each side of the train.
The interior advertising included a wrap on the end of the train and doors on each side of the train.
Making the fault line at the point where the two train doors meet was a cool design element. Unfortunately, I didn't get the chance to record a video of the door opening to emulate the intended disaster-movie experience.
Making the fault line at the point where the two train doors meet was a cool design element. Unfortunately, I didn’t get the chance to record a video of the door opening to emulate the intended disaster-movie experience.

Alternate (more immediate) revenue streams for public transport (Service design) – Penalty fares

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From 1 January 2017, they’re no longer handing out on-the-spot penalty fares.


Why are you stopping On-the-spot Penalty Fares?

We’re working hard to make the public transport system simpler for everyone.

Recent reviews found that our current public transport warnings and fines aren’t striking the right balance between fare compliance and what’s fair and reasonable.

The Age – End of the line for $75 on-the-spot myki penalty fares

Advertising inside Melbourne’s Metro Trains

An uncommon sight. Advertising on the inside one of  Melbourne’s Metro Trains. This could be a test for a possible revenue stream for the franchise operator of our suburban railway network. I’ve seen advertising on the outside of trains before, but never on the inside. This is new.

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Also, the irony of an advertising campaign for Melbourne Airport on a train network that currently doesn’t and probably never will connect to the airport isn’t lost on me.